Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How long will I be able to weld with a pair of batteries before I will need to recharge them?
  2. What type of batteries and charger should I buy, and what type of maintenance do I need to perform on the batteries?
  3. Does the trigger control power to the tip and does the wire feed speed control knob adjust the amperage level fed to the electrode?
  4. I've got two 12 volt batteries under the hood of my vehicle. Can I hook up the Ready-Welder II to these batteries with the motor running and batteries cable still connected?
  5. Can I connect the RW-II to my Miller/Lincoln etc MIG or ARC welder to use as a "spool gun" attachment?

1. How long will I be able to weld with a pair of batteries before I will need to recharge them?

Answer: Many factors will determine the length of acceptable quality welding duration time, with the primary factors being the the type and size of batteries used and the type of welding being performed. The thicker the metal being welded the greater the amperage draw will need to be to obtain satisfactory results,which will drain the batteries faster. The size and amp hour ratings of the batteries used will determine the total amount of power available and thus the welding time available, We typically recommend group 31 marine deep cycle batteries as a power source for the Ready Welder II. A fully charged pair of these batteries will normally yield a minimum duration of about 45 minutes when welding 1/2" steel or 3/4" aluminum @ 175 amps, while lighter duty welding operations on thinner metal can offer a duration time of 4 hours or more. Please see the operating guidelines page for more battery discussion.


2. What type of batteries and charger should I buy, and what type of maintenance do I need to perform on the batteries?

Answer: We highly recommend the purchase of good quality ,12 volt deep-cycle marine/RV batteries ranging from group 24 to group31, which is our preference. Get the kind with vertical posts capped with wing-nuts for easy power connections to the RW-II. Regular auto batteries and other batteries not designed for deep cycle discharging and recharging will have a shorter life span if drawn too low too many times. For occasional welding this shouldn't be a problem. For home use a 10 amp overnight charging will work well. Maintenence of batteries should be according to manufactures instructions.


3. Does the trigger control power to the tip and does the wire feed speed control knob adjust the amperage level fed to the electrode?

Answer: No in both cases. The trigger controls wire feed (on-off) and gas flow but does not control power feeding to the tip. The tip is live whenever the RW-II is connected to power source. The red plastic connectors in the RW-II power cable are designed to be easily disconnected to de-power the welder between uses without having to disconnect the cables at the power source. The wire feed control knob only indirectly affects the amperage transmitted based upon the physical volume of wire being fed to the bead, and this effect is usually moderate. Use of thinner wire, say .023" will reduce amperage to some extent.


4. I've got two 12 volt batteries under the hood of my vehicle. Can I hook up the Ready-Welder II to these batteries with the motor running and batteries cable still connected?

Answer: No. The batteries are normally wired in parallel for these applications (assuming your vehicle operates ion 12 volt) and the RWI-II normally uses 24 volt for welding and requires these batteries to be wired in series. Be sure to read the operating instructions page for some exception to the 24 volt rule! Leaving the batteries connected to the vehicles electrical system while the RW-II may cause severe damage to the vehicles electrical system. Don't do it! Quick disconnects are readily available from Wal-Mart and other stores that make this easier.


5. Can I connect the RW-II to my Miller/Lincoln etc MIG or ARC welder to use as a "spool gun" attachment?

Answer: Quite possibly. The RW-II was designed for pure DC and does not tolerate AC, voltage spikes or input levels which exceed 48 volts. The circuit board brain of the RW-II is very sensitive to waveform distortions as well. Welding machines with "constant voltage" and/or "constant current" DC outputs which can be adjusted to levels between 24 and 36 volts DC, may work just fine, but keep in mind that the RW-II was designed for batteries and any other power source may cause problems.